child dentistry

Child Dentistry

Normally the first tooth erupts between ages 6 to 12 months. Gums are sore, tender and sometimes irritable until the age of 3. Rubbing sore gums gently with a clean finger, the back of a cold spoon or a cold, wet cloth helps soothe the gums. Teething rings work well, but avoid teething biscuits—they contain sugar that is not good for baby teeth.

Tooth decay in infants can be minimized or totally prevented by not allowing sleeping infants to breast or bottle-feed. Infants that need a bottle to comfortably fall asleep should be given a water-filled bottle or a pacifier. Our office is dedicated to fighting baby bottle tooth decay. Let us know if you notice any signs of decay or anything unusual in your child’s mouth.

Regular Dental Check-up's
During the initial dental check-up we will discuss your child’s medical and dental history. Your child’s teeth will be examined and cleaned to remove any plaque or unsightly stain build-up that could irritate gums or cause tooth decay. Your child’s systemic fluoride status will be evaluated and a fluoride varnish may be applied to prevent cavities and strengthen teeth. Your child will also learn the proper techniques for brushing and flossing and the importance of limited snacking.

Even if your child has never had a cavity, she/he can still benefit from regular visits to assess any changes in your child’s oral and facial growth and development. Your child may need fluoride supplements or sealants. We will also identify any orthodontic problems and suggest treatment to keep your child’s smile beautiful.

We partner with you to decide what treatment is best for your child, and value your opinion about any treatment option–for regular checkups, fillings, sedations, extractions, or root canals. We use the newest procedures and techniques to ensure patient safety and comfort.

Healthy Eating Habits

Healthy eating habits lead to healthy teeth. Like the rest of the body, the teeth, bones and the soft tissues of the mouth need a well-balanced diet. Children should eat a variety of foods from the five major food groups. Most snacks that children eat can lead to cavity formation. The more frequently a child snacks, the greater the chance for tooth decay. How long food remains in the mouth also plays a role. For example, hard candy and breath mints stay in the mouth a long time, which cause longer acid attacks on tooth enamel. If your child must snack, choose nutritious foods such as vegetables, low-fat yogurt, nuts, nut butters and low-fat cheese which are healthier and better for children’s teeth.